Spokesdog's Canine Couch

A journey about dogs and their people by Diane Rich

$20 Neuter Surgeries For Dogs and Cats At Seattle Humane

January 3rd, 2014 at 2:26 pm by Diane Rich
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Happy Neuter Year!
Seattle Humane Society & PetSmart Charities team up for Happy Neuter Year

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 Get your male dog or cat fixed for just $20 in January. The Seattle Humane Society and PetSmart Charities® are joining forces to provide low-fee neuter surgeries for dogs and cats belonging to income-qualified pet owners in King County. Pets receiving the surgery must be at least four months of age. Each pet will also be given a free microchip identification, and vaccinations will be available at $10 for cats, and $15 for dogs as part of this special package. This discount is for males only.Neutering actually improves a pet’s health! The surgery eliminates prostate cancer in males, and has many other benefits too, such as making pets less likely to roam and get into fights.If you have an unaltered pet or know someone who does, make an appointment online today at seattlehumane.org/fix or call (425) 649-7560. For a list of Happy Neuter Year particpating organizations, please visit http://bit.ly/petsmarthny.Speaking Woof,
Diane
Diane Rich Dog Training, LLC
www.spokesdog.com
askdiane@spokesdog.com
www.twitter.com/spokesdog
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ABOUT SEATTLE HUMANE
Seattle Humane Society has received the coveted 4-star rating by Charity Navigator, America’s largest independent charity evaluator, for the fifth consecutive year! Founded in 1897 to bring people and pets together, Seattle Humane Society provides incredible companion animals for adoption 7 days a week, pet workshops and training, a pet food bank, a low-fee spay/neuter surgery program, humane teen club, a visiting pets program and more. Seattle Humane Society is located in Bellevue, at 13212 SE Eastgate Way.  For directions and more information, visit www.seattlehumane.org or call (425) 641-0080.

ABOUT PETSMART CHARITIES®

PetSmart Charities, Inc. is a nonprofit animal welfare organization that saves the lives of homeless pets. More than 400,000 dogs and cats find homes each year through our adoption program in all PetSmart® stores and our sponsored adoption events. PetSmart Charities grants more money to directly help pets in need than any other animal welfare group in North America, with a focus on funding spay/neuter services that help communities solve pet overpopulation. PetSmart Charities is a 501(c)(3) organization, separate from PetSmart, Inc.

The Real Poop On Pups

January 1st, 2014 at 1:39 pm by Diane Rich
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From a Pup’s Point of View
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cDiane Rich 2013

Pups are so darn cute and begin life as innocent beings. They learn so much so quickly.   Some of their mischievous behavior and time intensive requirements may make you question your sanity as to why you brought a pup into your life but then they give you that look, you know the one and you melt forgetting why you were upset.
GSD garan 10 weeks 11-10
c Diane Rich 2013

From the mouth of canine babes, here are some tips for the New Year to help puppy parents understand life from a puppy’s point of view.

1. Please have realistic expectations when I am going through puppyhood.  I know you think I am being naughty on purpose, in most cases I am just  being a puppy. Teach me.

2. Please do not think “I should know better.” I only know what you  have taught me, or let me get away
with sometimes. Please be consistent with what you want from me.
Vizsla Quincy 9 weeks 2-10
c Diane Rich 2013

3. Be patient with me, I am trying to understand what you want.  Yes I can be a handful sometimes,  so can you.

4. I forgive you for your mistakes, please do the same for me.

5.  Yes, I may embarrass you in front of strangers or family but I can also be so angelic and so good they
will think you are the best pet parent in the whole world
toy poodle bear 3-12
c Diane Rich 2013

6. I want you to know that I don’t miss a thing.  My new life is about observation, exploration, testing myself and oh by the way testing you, too.

7. To me your shoes, socks and underwear smell like you.  You are my person so it is comforting for me to chew on them when you leave them around.

8. I love it when I have a thing in my mouth and you run after me flapping your arms like a bird, making loud noises and breathing hard, you are a bit scary at that moment but seem to want to play with me

9. I am not sure why you keep touching me when I eat or why you take away my food and then give it back to me. It makes me frustrated sometimes and I am learning not to trust you around my food

10.  When you walk me and attach some new thing to me that stops me from enjoying new smells it confuses me that you are not enjoying these smells too.  And, you are so slow. Hopefully you can keep up with me.

11.  I do not understand why you play with me so rough and seem to be having fun then get angry with me when I play rough back

12.  I do not understand why when you are angry with me you grab me and hold me down on the ground until I stop squirming. I cannot remember what I did and you are scaring me.  When I grow up and am stronger, you’ll see how it feels to be treated so badly

13. I don’t understand why you leave me all day, alone. Come home and seem to be happy to see me, and then leave me again.  I need you, you are all I have.

14.  The place you took me to with so many other dogs coming up to me so quickly scared me.  I wanted you to help me but you were busy talking to another human.  I am learning not to trust you. I hope we don’t go back there.

15.  I like humans but am not sure why humans  come up to me and stick their hand out or get in my face.  It makes me feel very uncomfortable sometimes and they don’t seem to understand me when I try to tell them that what they are doing scares me. I needed your help but you pulled me over to them making me get too close.  I am learning not to trust you.

16. I really liked it when I did something that seemed to make you talk and act happy.  Thank you for letting me know I pleased you.  I like that.

17. I am confused when you ignore the things you used to like that I did so I am going to stop doing them.

18. I really love being outside in our yard.  I hear what sounds like the name you have for me but then hear you get loud and I think you want me near you.  I had to smell a few things but then when I was near you, you yelled at me.  I thought coming near you was a good thing. I won’t do that anymore if I don’t have to.

19. I hope I am as good of a hunter as you when I grow up.  You always have food for me.

20. I love you and hope I am with you the rest of my life.
lucy chase on bed FR chase chew on toy
c Diane Rich 2013

Speaking Woof,
Diane
Diane Rich Dog Training, LLC
www.spokesdog.com
askdiane@spokesdog.com
www.twitter.com/spokesdog

Fireworks Are No Fun For Pets

December 31st, 2013 at 11:26 am by Diane Rich
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FIREWORKS ARE NO FUN FOR PETS!
Seattle Humane Society offers pet safety tips for New Year’s Eve
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Make this New Year’s celebration SAFE for you and your pets! Big gatherings, kabooms and brilliant fireworks are exciting ways to ring in the new year, but they can be very frightening for our pets. With a little planning and precaution, you can ensure that this holiday is enjoyable for everyone.Pet Safety Tips for New Year’s Eve:• Keep pets indoors.
Keep your pets in a safe, enclosed room, preferably one without windows. If you’re having guests over, consider keeping pets in a room that’s off-limits to guests, with plenty of water and food.

• Create a calming environment.
Surround pets with their favorite toys and other familiar objects. Sometimes the smell of an article of clothing from your laundry can help comfort them. Play soothing music and keep the room as quiet as possible by closing doors, windows, and blinds.

• Update identification.
The biggest risk of all this New Year’s Eve is that pets will get loose and become lost. Even if a pet is secured inside, the sound of fireworks can cause extreme panic – sometimes causing them to even break through glass windows. Make sure your pets are microchipped and wearing identification tags. Call to confirm that the pet’s veterinarian and the microchip company have your current address and phone numbers.

The Seattle Humane Society offers $20 microchipping services for pets of income-restricted guardians, including national registration. Visit us at seattlehumane.org to learn more and have your pets microchipped today!

 

Speaking Woof,
Diane
Diane Rich Dog Training, LLC
www.spokesdog.com
askdiane@spokesdog.com
www.twitter.com/spokesdog

 


About the Seattle Humane Society
Seattle Humane Society has been awarded the coveted 4-star rating by Charity Navigator, America’s largest independent charity evaluator for the fifth consecutive year! Founded in 1897 to bring people and pets together, Seattle Humane Society provides incredible companion animals for adoption 7 days a week, pet workshops and training, a pet food bank, a low-fee spay/neuter surgery program, humane teen club, a visiting pets program and more.

STRANGER DANGER Applies To Dog Lovers, Too

December 26th, 2013 at 8:51 am by Diane Rich
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The Dog Lover

breeder sillohette small
Ah, yes the dog lover.  We are everywhere.

It is fun to see people enjoy loving our dogs.  Dogs can be a great ice breaker for conversation and your dog gets the added benefit of learning and maintaining good social skills.

Sometimes, however the overly enthusiastic dog lover can undermine efforts a dog parent is trying to create or reinforce with regard to puppy or dog manners when meeting a friendly stranger.  Sometimes a shy, nervous, or a fearful dog that is giving clear signals of discomfort to the experienced eye goes undetected by the dog lover who can’t wait to get their hands on your dog.

My Dog My Rules
Consider this subject line as your new pet parenting mantra.
tazz ramseys bell park 9-11
c Diane Rich 2013
Some dog owners are comfortable setting up meet and greet boundaries with their dog and strangers. Other pet parents would rather not offend the stranger and choose to allow that stranger carte blanche access to the dog.   Your dog may enjoy the attention from some strangers but also looks to you for protection from overzealous, well intended dog lovers. By not stepping up you could put that stranger at risk if you allow that person access to a dog that does not welcome the attention as the leash prevents your dog’s escape.  More importantly, by not managing or preventing an interaction your shy dog can become even more leery and nervous around any future encounters with well meaning strangers.

I believe one of the many ways dogs learn to trust their people is being with a handler who manages the meet and greet from beginning to end rather than behaving as if this interaction is a spectator sport.

I feel like I have seen it all in almost 3 decades as a dog trainer and long time dog parent but suspect there are more surprises just around the corner.

Are any of these scenarios familiar to you?
1. You are out with your dog, enjoying the day  and a 4 or 5 year old child runs over to pet or stick their face in your dog’s face and their parent or guardian is either not around or standing and watching from afar?
bentley camp korey eye to eye with camper 8-11 organ trans 
c Diane Rich 2013

2. You are in pet store or a retail store that allows pets or at a dog park and someone comes up and puts a cookie in reach of your dog without asking permission. Or, the human cookie dispenser is asking permission while the treat is in transit towards the dog?

3. You are in a pet store or retail store that allows pets or walking your dog in your neighborhood and someone comes up to pet your small dog or puppy and without asking permission scoops your dog right off the ground for a cuddle?

4. Your dog is in your car with a window partially rolled down quietly waiting for you to return and you notice some idiot sticking their hand in the car through the window to pet your dog?

5. Susan Clothier, a well known trainer who coined the catch phrase “he just wants to say hi” which provides a great lead in for the following;  you note an owner  about 10 or 15 feet behind their dog that is on a flexi leash hogging all the real estate and cutting off your access to continue on your path.  That dog is allowed to come over to your dog for a sniff without the owner batting an eye. This particular owner feels they own as much real estate as the retractable leash allows. This owner has no idea if your dog will welcome the intrusion.

6. In addition to #5, the owner with a dog on a flexi or regular walking leash allows their dog to pull that handler over to your dog, stating their dog is ok AFTER “he says hi” and when you opt out that person is miffed and educates you on the benefits of socialization?

7. You educate the stranger on petting your pup under the chin or on the chest and due to the dog lover’s selective hearing and expertise they choose to pat your pup on the head then when the pup mouths them the dog lover starts rough housing with your puppy?

8. When meeting another dog lover at your local dog park you learn the new owner just adopted their dog from rescue and wants to see how their new dog will be with other dogs?
cassie L. B 2-11
c Diane Rich 2013

9. The stranger approaches your dog and you tell the dog lover your dog is shy, uncomfortable or aggressive with strangers and ask them nicely not to approach. They approach anyway believing if they love dogs, dogs will love them in return. This dog lover follows old school information sticking out the back of their hand so the shy, nervous or aggressive dog can get a whiff.

Dog lovers on either end of the leash are not always observant as to the pup’s body language that will clearly indicate stress or fear upon the approach of that stranger. Forcing a meet and greet with a shy dog is not recommended. An experienced dog behavior expert can guide you properly through positive meet and greet protocol and can educate you how to read your dog’s body language.

10.  A stranger asks if they can give your dog a treat and you politely decline. They slip a treat to your dog anyway with a comment or two about how mean you are.

My Final Thoughts
If your dog is well mannered, is everyone’s buddy and you are comfortable allowing strangers to pet your dog and manage that interaction, fantastic.  However, if a stranger does not respect your wishes after you nicely state how you want your dog to be touched , or in some cases not touched why on earth would you as that dog’s guardian put your furry family member in a position to tolerate the love of a stranger or even the  inappropriate way that stranger chooses to approach, pet or rough house with your dog ?  I understand not wanting to be rude to someone but allowing the interaction that may not be welcome by your dog or choosing not to manage that interaction could end up being a problem for all in the near future

Speaking Woof,
Diane
Diane Rich Dog Training, LLC
www.spokesdog.com
askdiane@spokesdog.com
www.twitter.com/spokesdog

Merry Christmas and A Happy New Year

December 22nd, 2013 at 6:04 pm by Diane Rich
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hike chase alpental snow
c Diane Rich 2013

Chase and I wish you and yours the very best this holiday season

Warm Woofs,
Diane
Diane Rich Dog Training, LLC
www.spokesdog.com
askdiane@spokesdog.com
www.twitter.com/spokesdog

 

Thinking Of Donating To An Animal Non Profit This Season?

December 12th, 2013 at 1:26 pm by Diane Rich
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Think Transparency

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I am reposting my blog from December 2012 as I received a number of emails last year from pet lovers around the country who found out after the fact where their donation was really spent.  These people told me they learned that a small amount or none of their money was used for the animals.  So, let the giver beware.

There are many worthy animal nonprofits to consider for donations.  Some charities are in your own city and state and are worth considering. Other non profits are national and others international. Do your homework before mailing the check.

1.Transparency?
A charity should make it easy for donors and potential donors to review the budget. Depending on how much money a nonprofit takes in they may be required to file specific forms with the IRS providing required documentation. These forms such as Form 990 are open to the public. Form 990 gives a breakdown of revenue, expenses and service accomplishments. Ask to see Form 990 and analyze it to ensure you are comfortable with the charity’s operations. Some private charities are not required to file Form 990s and do not have to provide a copy of their IRS tax filings to the public upon request. You will have to do research these organizations on your own.

2. Independent Auditing?
Find out if the charity is audited yearly by a reputable accounting firm and ask for the latest report from a certified independent  public accountant.

Although most charities abide by strict standards and ethics with finances unfortunately some nonprofits may misrepresent how funds are used when presenting financial records.   If someone running the non profit is unethical they will tell a potential donor what they want to hear to motivate that big hearted person to part with some money And to make it worse some corporations generously will match funds of employee donations so it could be a jackpot for those who get away with deceptive practices.  On the other hand, that policy is wonderful for the ethical non profits.

3. How is the Charity Run?
Are the board of directors active or passive. Are staff members accessible and friendly?  Are volunteers respected and heard or is the volunteer turnover high?  It is easy to write a heartwarming mission statement but is the charity actually living its mission.

4. Skills?
A nonprofit business is still a business. Do the people running the charity have the skills to effectively run the organization or their department? People skills are the heart and soul of all nonprofits along with marketing and fundraising.

5. Conflict of Interest?
Is there any conflict of interest with a board member, the President or staff and their outside interests that may influence them when making decisions for policies or procedures for the charity? Are there conflicts of interest if someone is running both a nonprofit and for profit business that may overlap?

6. Is the Mission Statement just Words?
Every nonprofit is required to create a mission statement when applying for non-profit status. The mission statement is normally included on a website and promotional material. Are the people running the charity in touch with this statement or are the words just warm and fuzzy to entice animal lovers to open their wallets?

Charities To Consider
1. If your choice as to where to donate is an animal shelter then I am hopeful you choose a no kill shelter.

2. You may choose to donate to one of many wonderful breed rescue organizations around the country. If money is tight for you this season, ask the rescue group or shelter what they need. Donating unopened pet food or gently used pet supplies is greatly appreciated.

3. Consider donating to a nonprofit set up to help pet parents with limited funds or a fixed income with Veterinary costs. Inquire as to how those funds are managed.

4. Other animal nonprofits to consider train service or assistance dogs used for various disabilities such as guide dogs for the blind, the hearing impaired or other medical challenges. Some of these organizations breed their own dogs for this service.

5. There are also animal sanctuaries such as Best Friends in Utah.  www.bestfriends.org.

6. There is Intermountain Therapy Animals in Utah that created a program called R.E.A.D. A literacy program for kids that is the model for all the other reading programs around the country.  www.therapyanimals.org

7. There are non profits that train or help match up Veterans with trained dogs to assist them with PTSD

8. If you donate to your local humane society, don’t be confused with the HSUS, the Humane Society of the United States. The HSUS is it’s own charity.  Please donate directly to your local humane society.  www.seattlehumane.org

9. Dogs on deployment is another charity to consider. When someone is in the military and called to duty what do they do with the family pet?  Go to this link to find out  www.dogsondeployment.org

Privacy Policies
Inquire as to the charity’s privacy policy to ensure your name won’t be sold or traded, period.

Here is a link that will provide additional information to help review a charity. Some of your local smaller charities will be more challenging to research.

http://cashmoneylife.com/is-a-charity-legitimate/

Speaking Woof,
Diane
Diane Rich Dog Training,LLC
www.spokesdog.com
askdiane@spokesdog.com
www.twitter.com/spokesdog

Make This Holiday Season A Safe One For The Family Pet

December 10th, 2013 at 9:21 am by Diane Rich
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Safety Tips Before, During, And After Your Christmas Celebration

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c Diane Rich 2013

Tis another season full of anticipation, smiles, angst, online shopping, in store adventures, travel and long to do lists.

Whether you are hosting parties at your home, attending parties, traveling or celebrating in a quieter manner I encourage you to keep your pet’s safety in mind.

                                                                            20 Tips

  1. Prepare and train your dog now to prevent him from bolting out of the front door if you are expecting guests.   A good stay or wait command is critical to teach before the craziness begins. If you opt out of training then it is safer to just confine your dog behind a gate or in a crate temporarily while guests arrive and leave.
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    c Diane Rich 2013
  2. The day before and day of your party exercise your dog to tire her out especially if she will exiled away from all the activities. If you can score a dog walker this late in the game to help you out, great.
  3. Make sure your guests, especially children are educated on how you want your dog handled.  Children under the age of 8 should always be supervised around the family dog even if the relationship has worked out well in the past. No dog should be expected to ”tolerate” inappropriate interactions from anyone and may need to be protected from overzealous dog lovers
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    c Diane Rich 2013
  4. When it is meal time for the family dog find a quiet location so the dog can enjoy dinner in peace.
  5. Should you wish to discourage your dog begging at the table or eating food that may create a tummy upset remind your guests not to give your dog any table scraps and not to feed your dog from the table.  Fatty foods can cause gastrointestinal problems. Cooked bones are a no no and may require an emergency Vet visit if your dog scores a bone
  6. If you believe your dog may look at your Christmas tree as one of his gifts beckoning to him to lift his leg and relieve himself on it you may want to create a barrier so the tree, gifts and ornaments are inaccessible.  Beyond destruction or marking, some dogs have been known to pull a tree over
  7. Cords used for holiday lighting may draw your pup’s attention so be sure the cords are taped down or inaccessible to your inquisitive canine chewer.
  8. If the festivities seem to be making your dog nervous, your dog may need to be relocated to another part of the house away from the party and guests hopefully will respect that area and leave the dog alone.  A crate can be a safe escape for a young dog.
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    c Diane Rich 2013
  9. Everyone loves a puppy. Keep in mind your pup like a human baby has limits.  You need to not only set boundaries but manage all interactions especially rough housing and guests wanting to constantly pick the pup up.
    bulldog bowzer 4mths 5-11
    c Diane Rich 2013
  10. Keep plants out of reach
  11. Alcohol, macadamia nuts, grapes, raisons, onions, garlic, coffee beans and dark chocolate can be life threatening to dogs if consumed.
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    c Diane Rich 2013
  12. Keep your local emergency Vet’s number handy
  13. Make sure your dog’s collar includes an ID tag in case they bolt out the front door or if outside an open gate.
  14. If you want to share some cooked unseasoned turkey or meat with your dog a few small pieces should not hurt your dog.  A dog allowed to overindulge could get quite sick.  Best to stick with the dog’s regular diet
  15. Remember to include your dog on your Christmas shopping list.   Should you choose to give your dog a plush, squeaky type toy supervise the activity so the squeaker or stuffing are not swallowed.
  16. If your dog gets cranky with people around her food bowl inform your guests to steer clear of the dog when she is eating or feed her in another room away from children or adults.
  17. If the temperature in your zip code is too cold for you it is too cold for most dogs. Your dog should be able enjoy your warm home rather than enduring cold, outdoor conditions.
  18. Allowing children to chase or harass the dog is ill advised.  Although everyone is busy enjoying holiday festivities this may be a good time to teach children how to pet and respect the family dog
  19. Your guests who may have excused your dog’s enthusiastic greeting of jumping on them may not be so thrilled if wet or muddy paws make contact with holiday clothing
  20. Wrappers and ribbons anxiously ripped off presents need to be discarded so your dog or cat isn’t tempted to chew or swallow packaging.

Wishing you a safe and Merry Christmas.

Speaking Woof,
Diane
Diane Rich Dog Training, LLC
www.spokesdog.com
askdiane@spokesdog.com
www.twitter.com/spokesdog

 

Protect Your Pets In Freezing Weather

December 5th, 2013 at 1:22 pm by Diane Rich
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temp gage car 12-13
c Diane Rich 2013
PROTECT YOUR PETS IN FREEZING WEATHER
Seattle Humane offers tips to keep pets safe and healthy
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With snow and freezing temperatures upon us, it’s time to prepare pets for the winter weather. Seattle Humane offers these tips to keep pets safe when the temperature dips.

Keep Pets Indoors
Pets can get frostbite, too! Never leave your pet outside in freezing temperatures for an extended period of time. On freezing cold days, keep your walks and snow-romps short. Never let your dog off the leash on snow or ice. Dogs can lose their scent and easily become lost. Research shows that more dogs are lost during winter than any other season. Always make sure your pet is microchipped and wears ID tags.Dress Appropriately
A dog’s coat provides some insulation against the cold, but short-haired dogs need a coat or sweater for additional warmth while outside.Increase Food Supply
Dogs have to work harder to stay warm when exercising outside. Increasing their food supply, particularly protein, will keep them in tip-top shape.

Beware of Seasonal Poisons
Coolant and antifreeze can spill in the garage or on the street and are lethal to dogs and cats. A dog’s paws, legs and stomach should be wiped off when coming in out of the rain, sleet, snow or ice. Make sure to use dog booties to prevent your pet from getting chemicals and street salt on the pads of their feet, which can lead to burns and poisoning if they lick their feet.

Offer Warm Sleeping Spots
Pets belong inside with the rest of the family. Providing a warm place to sleep, off of the floor and away from drafts, will keep dogs and cats feeling comfortable during the cold months.S

Save a Life by Tapping on Your Hood
Outdoor cats will climb under the hoods of cars for warmth, so be safe and bang loudly on the car’s hood before starting the engine to give any sleeping cats a chance to vacate.

Speaking Woof,
Diane
Diane Rich Dog Training, LLC
www.spokesdog.com
askdiane@spokesdog.com
www.twitter.com/spokesdog

If you suspect that an animal is being neglected or abused, please contact your local animal control agency. For a list of agencies in your area visit our website at seattlehumane.org.

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About the Seattle Humane Society
Seattle Humane Society has been awarded the coveted 4-star rating by Charity Navigator, America’s largest independent charity evaluator for the fifth consecutive year! Founded in 1897 to bring people and pets together, Seattle Humane Society provides incredible companion animals for adoption 7 days a week, pet workshops and training, a pet food bank, a low-fee spay/neuter surgery program, humane teen club, a visiting pets program and more.

Happy Thanksgiving

November 27th, 2013 at 4:57 pm by Diane Rich
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chase nature hike 11-11
c Diane Rich 2013

Wishing you a Happy Thanksgiving with family and friends.

Speaking Woof,
Diane
Diane Rich Dog Training, LLC
www.spokesdog.com
askdiane@spokesdog.com
www.twitter.com/spokesdog

Two Minutes to Shine

November 22nd, 2013 at 10:51 am by Diane Rich
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The National Dog Show by Purina Airs November 28th

I had the wonderful opportunity recently to participate with other bloggers in a pre-broadcast conference call to interview David Frei  and John O’Hurley,  the cohosts of this popular televised dog show.  As most dog enthusiasts know, David Frei is an expert analyst for Westminster and the National Dog Show. He has years of experience breeding and showing dogs and is also an AKC judge.  Of course who doesn’t know J. Peterman of Seinfeld fame.  John O’Hurley has been a cohost with David over the years and brings his wit and humor to the viewers.  These hosts are a great combination.

The National Dog Show in Philadelphia held annually since 1933 has over 2000 dogs entered in this show and includes 190 breeds . There are 3 new AKC breeds for this year’s big event.  The new breeds are; The Chinook in the working category, Rat Terrier in the Terrier category and the Portuguese Podengo Pequeno in the Hound group.

Show dogs are primped, pampered and groomed down to their last hair so they can each strut their coiffed stuff for 2 minutes in front of a judge to earn their way to the prize, Best in Show.  The timeline to perform in the ring is quick and seems similar to our Thanksgiving celebration whereas it can take a week to prepare a meal for family and friends and minutes to consume the bounty on Turkey Day.  The dogs and handlers need to bring their A game during their short time in front of a judge.

The National Dog Show airs at noon in all time zones and follows the Macy’s Day parade. The show is one of the oldest benched shows in the United States since 1933.  A benched show is open to the public and participating dogs are on display when not competing in the ring.  It is a wonderful opportunity for people to meet different breeds and talk with the breeders or handlers about the dog.  In some cases the breeder and handler are one in the same.

David Frei commented that the best handler is one who is invisible so the dog shines. He goes on to say the dog should be paying attention to the handler which is something a new dog owner parenting a purebred or mixed breed learns in puppy class.

One of the bloggers asked where the dogs are housed during the show .  David replied that some handlers who live in the area just drive in for the day while handlers from out of town may nest in their own motor home so the dogs can travel and stay in a familiar environment before and between their show times. Other handlers may opt to stay in a pet friendly hotel or a hotel that made special accommodations and will allow entered dogs on site just for this dog show.

Another blogger asked about those oops moments that happen either behind the scenes or on camera and John O’Hurley shared a story about a Great Dane that stopped and squatted in front of him leaving a donation.  John felt it was the dog’s opinion of his performance.

When asked which dogs we should be watching, neither gentleman would give up any breed info.  A perfect tease for us to tune in.  They both said it will be an exciting lineup and is the most exciting group of dogs to date at the National Dog Show.

David Frei talked about his pet therapy group, Angel on a Leash which is a 501 3c and is a national therapy organization. He and his personal dogs visit kids at the Ronald McDonald House and Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.  David was asked what makes a good therapy dog and being involved with therapy service, I agreed with his answer.  He said therapy dogs are born not made.

John O’Hurley made a wonderful comment that the Best in Show is not really the dog that wins in the ring but the real Best in Show is the dog that is sitting next to you on the couch.   To this statement I am sure we all agree.

Speaking Woof,
Diane
Diane Rich Dog Training, LLC
www.spokesdog.com
askdiane@spokesdog.com
www.twitter.com/spokesdog

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About Diane Rich

I have been training dogs and their people for over 25 years. I work with pups from 7 weeks old to senior plus dogs and offer basic obedience to advanced off leash training both privately and group classes. Other services include behavior consultations to help both ends of the leash with everything from aggression, puppy/dog manners and public manners to separation anxiety. As a "real world" dog trainer, I take training out of the classroom or home when both the pet and family are ready, and take training to the street. I also offer pet therapy training classes preparing both the handler and dog for their therapy test and future service as a therapy team. I also coordinate several pet therapy programs in the Seattle area. My complete bio, description of services, class dates and on line class registration is listed on my website at www.spokesdog.com.

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